Cover: Bargaining Power Within Couples and Use of Prenatal and Delivery Care in Indonesia

Bargaining Power Within Couples and Use of Prenatal and Delivery Care in Indonesia

Published 2001

by Kathleen Beegle, Elizabeth Frankenberg, Duncan Thomas

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Indonesian women's power relative to that of their husband's is examined to determine how it affects use of prenatal and delivery care. Holding household resources constant, a woman's control over economic resources affects the couple's decisionmaking. Compared with a woman with no assets that she perceives as being her own, a woman with some share of household assets influences reproductive health decisions. Evidence suggests that her influence on service use also varies if a woman is better educated than her husband, comes from a background of higher social status than her husband's, or if her father is better educated than her father-in-law. Therefore, both economic and social dimensions of the distribution of power between spouses influence use of services, and conceptualizing power as multidimensional is useful for understanding couples' behavior.

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Originally published in: Studies in Family Planning, v. 32, no. 2, 2001, pp. 130-146.

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