Strengthening Research Portfolio Evaluation at the Medical Research Council

Developing a survey for the collection of information about research outputs

by Sharif Ismail, Jan Tiessen, Steven Wooding

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The Medical Research Council (MRC) wished to better understand the wider impact of MRC research output on society and the economy. The MRC wanted to: compare the strengths of different types of funding and areas of research; identify the good news stories and successes it can learn from. As an initial step in this process RAND Europe: (1) examined the range of output and outcome information MRCalready collected; and (2) to used that analysis to suggest how data collection could be improved. This report outlines the approach taken to the second part of this exercise and focuses on the development of a new survey instrument to support the MRC’s data collection approach. Readers should bear in mind that some later stages of survey development and implementation were conducted exclusively by the MRC and are not reported here.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter One

    Introduction

  • Chapter Two

    Conceptualising the System

  • Chapter Three

    Choosing an Appropriate Tool for Research Evaluation

  • Chapter Four

    Developing a Survey Tool to Support the MRC's Research portfolio evaluation

  • Chapter Five

    Testing and Improving the Survey Tool with Stakeholders

  • Chapter Six

    Conclusion

  • Appendix A

    Mapping Output Frameworks

  • Appendix B

    Comparing Research Pathways

Research conducted by

This research in this report was sponsored by the Medical Research Council (UK) and conducted by RAND Europe.

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