Childhood Trauma

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Children exposed to traumatic or stressful events can experience psychological problems that have long-lasting effects. RAND research on childhood trauma — such as family conflicts, natural disasters, sexual assault, the death of a family member, school violence and bullying, and the trauma faced by immigrant children — examines the impact of such events on an individual's life course.

  • Children take shelter under desks during an earthquake simulation in an evacuation drill in Tokyo, Japan, March 10, 2017, photo by Issei Kato/Reuters

    Essay

    Childhood Trauma Is More Common Than You Think. This School-Based Intervention Can Help

    Apr 23, 2019

    A program developed at RAND helps children exposed to trauma confront and subdue their stress and anxiety. The program grew out of the 1990s street violence of South Los Angeles and has since helped kids from Newtown to Fukushima. Researchers are tailoring this intervention for children in Puerto Rico whose lives were upended by hurricanes.

  • A guest looks at the Temple of Time, a structure built to serve as a healing place for those affected by the shooting which claimed 17 lives at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Coral Springs, Florida, February 14, 2019, photo by Joe Skipper/Reuters

    Commentary

    After School Shootings, Children and Communities Struggle to Heal

    Jul 19, 2019

    School shootings leave wounds that affect students, school staff, families, and communities for years. Building community resilience, implementing evidence-based mental health support early, and providing access for survivors and the community immediately and in the long term could help promote healing and prevent more tragedy.

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