Long-Term Care

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More than 12 million Americans depend on long-term care for help with everyday activities such as bathing or dressing. This group includes veterans and people with disabilities, but it is primarily comprised of seniors. Thus, the number will likely soar as the baby boom generation ages. RAND research on long-term care can help health providers and policymakers meet the growing demand for high-quality, affordable care.

  • Mother and daughter look out a window, photo by MangoStar_Studio/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Should You Consider Taking a Loved One Out of a Long-Term Care Facility?

    Mar 30, 2020

    As modern living is changing during this pandemic, so is assisted living. Already, many of us are facing difficult decisions about whether someone we know should stay in an assisted living facility or be taken out due to the coronavirus crisis. If you're in the position to bring someone to hunker down with you, is it even a good idea?

  • A woman dressing her sick mother, photo by Phynart Studio/Getty Images

    Report

    Family Caregivers Should Be Included in Health Care Teams

    Nov 10, 2020

    About 53 million family and friends provide care and assistance to loved ones in the United States, but they are often overlooked by health care systems. Integrating them into a patient's health care team can help improve care quality and the quality of life for patients and their families.

Explore Long-Term Care

  • News Release

    News Release

    Efforts Needed to Expand Ability of Family Members to Integrate into Formal Health Care Teams

    Integrating family caregivers into a patient's health care team can help improve care quality and the quality of life for both patients and their families, yet family caregivers face significant barriers coordinating their efforts with the formal health care team.

    Nov 10, 2020

  • Blog

    COVID-19's Effects on Mental Health, Food Access, and Education: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on COVID-19 and mental health, food security challenges during the pandemic, supporting children while schools are closed, and more.

    Apr 3, 2020

  • Family caregiver helping familymember into bed, photo by byryo/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Recognizing Family Caregivers as Part of the Health Care Team

    Recent shifts in health care practices have left family caregivers increasingly responsible for medical tasks. Given family caregivers' central role in medical care, there are efforts underway to improve family caregiver integration into the health care team, but there are barriers to effective integration and engagement.

    Nov 18, 2019

  • News Release

    News Release

    Average American's Risk of Needing Nursing Home Care Is Higher Than Previously Estimated

    The average American's lifetime risk of using a nursing home is substantially greater than previous research has suggested. Among persons age 57 to 61, 56 percent will stay in a nursing home at least one night during their lifetime.

    Aug 28, 2017

  • A son, father, and grandfather fishing from a dock

    Commentary

    Demographics Add Urgency for Action on Dementia Long-Term Care

    Dementia takes a huge toll on those afflicted with it but also has major consequences for those who must care for them. More than 15 million Americans provide care for loved ones with dementia—tending to their daily, routine needs and ensuring their medical needs are met.

    Jul 28, 2014

  • soldier welcomed home from Afghanistan, photo by Capt. Charlie Dietz/U.S. Army

    Report

    Hidden Heroes: America's Military Caregivers

    There are 5.5 million military caregivers across the United States, with nearly 20 percent caring for someone who served since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Military caregivers experience more health problems, face greater strains in family relationships, and have more workplace issues than noncaregivers. Changes are needed to both provide assistance to caregivers and to help them make plans for the future.

    Mar 31, 2014

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    Content

    Lori Frank

    Senior Behavioral Scientist
    Education Ph.D. in human development/gerontology, The Pennsylvania State University; M.A. in psychology/biopsychology, The Johns Hopkins University; B.A. in biology/psychology, University of Delaware

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    Catherine C. Cohen

    Policy Researcher
    Education B.A. in economics, biology, Swarthmore College; B.S. in nursing, Columbia University; Ph.D. in nursing, Columbia University

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    Sarah Dalton

    Policy Analyst
    Education M.A. in gerontology, University of Southern California; B.S. in psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

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    Andrew W. Dick

    Senior Economist
    Education Ph.D. in economics, Stanford University

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    Esther M. Friedman

    Behavioral and Social Scientist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in sociology, University of California - Los Angeles

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    Jordan M. Harrison

    Associate Policy Researcher
    Education B.S. in nursing, University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan; M.S. in health policy research, University of Pennsylvania

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    Harry H. Liu

    Senior Policy Researcher; Affiliate Faculty, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in health services research and policy, University of Rochester; M.S. in social medicine and health management, Fudan University; B.Med. in medicine, Shanghai Medical University

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    Debra Saliba

    Senior Natural Scientist
    Education M.D., University of Alabama; M.P.H. in epidemiology, UCLA School of Public Health

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