U.S. Marines receive a safety brief before they conduct live-fire drills during Trident Juncture 2015 in Almeria, Spain, October 27, 2015

commentary

(Defense News)

Building Interoperability for European Defense

U.S. Marines receive a safety brief before they conduct live-fire drills during Trident Juncture 2015 in Almeria, Spain, October 27, 2015

Photo by Cpl. Gabrielle Quire/U.S. Marine Corps

by Christopher G. Pernin and Jakub P. Hlavka

November 9, 2015

As Trident Juncture, the largest NATO exercise since 2002 draws to a close, the United States is bound to have the smallest military presence in Europe since the end of World War II.

In an attempt to make the most out of declining defense budgets, the thinking goes, the US needs to engage European forces to build interoperability that would enable joint operations to deter and defeat potential adversaries, even with little advance notice. Unfortunately, building interoperable units has often proved to be difficult even among the friendliest of nations....

The remainder of this commentary is available on defensenews.com.


Christopher G. Pernin is a senior physical scientist and Jakub P. J. Hlavka is an assistant policy analyst at the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation.

This commentary originally appeared on Defense News on November 6, 2015. Commentary gives RAND researchers a platform to convey insights based on their professional expertise and often on their peer-reviewed research and analysis.