Expert Insights: Crisis Response in a Changing Climate

Senior analyst Lucia Retter, is joined by Lieutenant General Richard Nugee, the non-executive director for climate change and sustainability for UK Defence, to discuss a study on the implications of climate change for UK defence logistics in crisis response situations, and how the research has informed the UK Ministry of Defence’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach.

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  • Reservists from 7 Battalion, The Rifles Reinforcing a Dam During Flooding, photo by Cpl Richard Cave LBPPA/Defence Images

    Project

    Crisis response in a changing climate

    May 4, 2021

    Researchers identified climate change challenges likely to emerge and propose five concrete policy actions that the UK Ministry of Defence could take to mitigate the impact of climate change on crisis response situations.

  • A Merlin helicopter comes in to drop off a Remover 3.1 mast during a snowy morning whilst on a helicopter flight trial at JADTEU, RAF Brize Norton, photo by 1st SAC David Turnbull/Royal Air Force Open Government License

    Project

    Implications of climate change for UK defence and security

    Jun 17, 2020

    Looking to 2035, the Ministry of Defence could play a key role in developing robust policy and programming on climate change. Researchers identified six high-level recommendations to support the MOD in developing an approach to address climate-related issues.

  • People walk down the street at a camp for displaced people while Hurricane Matthew approaches in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 3, 2016, photo by Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

    Commentary

    Climate Change Migration: Developing a Security Strategy for All

    Mar 15, 2021

    Jeannette Gaudry Haynie, Jay Balagna, et al.

    Over the past decade, an average of 21.5 million people annually have been forced to move due to the impacts of extreme weather. Building an understanding of the intersection between climate change, migration, and security is crucial and should take into account that many who face the most direct impacts of climate change are already among the most vulnerable.

  • A Syrian refugee woman walks between tents in Nizip refugee camp, near the Turkish-Syrian border in Gaziantep province, Turkey, November 30, 2016, photo by Umit Bektas/Reuters

    Commentary

    A New Way to Manage the Growing Global Refugee Situation

    As of 2020, a full 1 percent of humanity is living in displacement—as refugees, internally displaced persons, or asylum-seekers—because of conflict or persecution. The world's existing strategies for managing the displaced are no longer sufficient, but the next U.S. administration has an opportunity to lead the world in creating a new way forward.