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Strategy in the Missile Age was written during the dawn of the nuclear age, when the advent of intercontinental ballistic missiles necessitated a massive rethinking of military strategy and power. Originally published in 1959, it retains ample relevance today for its discussion of the origins of air power, its cornerstone position in the evolution of Cold War era nuclear strategy, and its treatment of preventive and preemptive attacks, deterrence, and the economics of strategy. Brodie, who believed nuclear war was “unthinkable,” thought much about the unthinkable and helped provide an intellectual framework for avoiding a nuclear catastrophe. Nearly fifty years after its initial publication, and to celebrate RAND’s 60th Anniversary, RAND is proud to bring this classic work back into print in paperback and digital formats.

This report is part of the RAND commercial book series. Periodically, RAND researchers publish with commercial presses. These books are not available from RAND but can be requested directly from the publisher, except in cases where the rights have reverted to RAND and we have republished a new edition.

RAND is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.