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In January 2003, RAND called together a group of renowned experts with knowledge in the fields of Islamic law, constitution writing, and democracy, and with specific country and regional expertise. Their task was to identify ways in which the constitution of Afghanistan could help put the country on the path to a strong, stable democracy characterized by good governance and rule of law, in which Islam, human rights, and Afghanistan's international obligations were respected, Keeping in mind the realities of Afghanistan's current situation and drawing from the experiences of other countries, the group identified practical ideas, particularly about the treatment of Islam in the constitution, for those involved in the drafting of Afghanistan's new constitution.

This research in the public interest was supported by RAND, using discretionary funds made possible by the generosity of RAND's donors and the fees earned on client-funded research.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation Conference proceeding series. RAND conference proceedings present a collection of papers delivered at a conference or a summary of the conference.

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