Cover: Ethnic and Racial Differences in Long-Term Survival from Hospitalization for HIV Infection

Ethnic and Racial Differences in Long-Term Survival from Hospitalization for HIV Infection

Published in: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, v. 11, no. 2, 2000, p. 163-178

Posted on rand.org 2000

by William Cunningham, David M. Mosen, Leo S. Morales, Ronald Andersen, Martin F. Shapiro, Ron D. Hays

This prospective cohort study compares 200 hospitalized, HIV-infected patients (Hispanic, African American, and white) from May 1992 to October 1998 to assess mortality (versus survival) over 75 months of follow-up. The relative risk of six-year mortality for each ethnic group is compared using Cox proportional hazards models after controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, access to general medical care, and HIV-specific treatment. The median survival of Hispanics (15.5 months) was significantly (p < 0.05) shorter than that of whites (23.8); survival for African Americans (35.1) did not differ from whites. In multivariate analysis, the adjusted relative risk of six-year mortality for Hispanics compared with whites was 2.14 (95 percent confidence interval = 1.26-3.66). The poor outcomes of Hispanics was not explained by access to general care or by HIV-specific treatment.

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