A Web-Based Platform to Support an Evidence-Based Mental Health Intervention

Lessons from the CBITS Web Site

Published In: Psychiatric Services, v. 65, no. 11, Nov. 2014, p. 1381-1384

Posted on RAND.org on January 01, 2014

by Pamela Vona, Pete Wilmoth, Lisa H. Jaycox, Janey S. McMillen, Sheryl H. Kataoka, Marleen Wong, Melissa E. DeRosier, Audra K. Langley, Joshua Kaufman, Lingqi Tang, Bradley D. Stein

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OBJECTIVE: To explore the role of Web-based platforms in behavioral health, the study examined usage of a Web site for supporting training and implementation of an evidence-based intervention. METHODS: Using data from an online registration survey and Google Analytics, the investigators examined user characteristics and Web site utilization. RESULTS: Site engagement was substantial across user groups. Visit duration differed by registrants' characteristics. Less experienced clinicians spent more time on the Web site. The training section accounted for most page views across user groups. Individuals previously trained in the Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools intervention viewed more implementation assistance and online community pages than did other user groups. CONCLUSIONS: Web-based platforms have the potential to support training and implementation of evidence-based interventions for clinicians of varying levels of experience and may facilitate more rapid dissemination. Web-based platforms may be promising for trauma-related interventions, because training and implementation support should be readily available after a traumatic event.

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