The Impact of Summer Learning Loss on Measures of School Performance

Published in: Education Finance and Policy, 2016

Posted on RAND.org on June 01, 2016

by Andrew McEachin, Allison Atteberry

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This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

State and federal accountability policies are predicated on the ability to estimate valid and reliable measures of school impacts on student learning. The typical spring- to-spring testing window potentially conflates the amount of learning that occurs during the school-year with learning that occurs during the summer. We use a unique dataset to explore the potential for students' summer learning to bias school-level value-added models used in accountability policies and research on school quality. The results of this paper raise important questions about the design of performance-based education policies, as well as schools' role in the production of students' achievement.

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