Cover: Community Engagement Compared with Technical Assistance to Disseminate Depression Care Among Low-Income, Minority Women

Community Engagement Compared with Technical Assistance to Disseminate Depression Care Among Low-Income, Minority Women

A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Study

Published in: American Journal of Public Health, 2016

Posted on rand.org Sep 13, 2016

by Victoria K. Ngo, Cathy D. Sherbourne, Bowen Chung, Lingqi Tang, Aziza Lucas-Wright, Yolanda Whittington, Kenneth B. Wells, Jeanne Miranda

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of a (CEP) versus a technical assistance approach (Resources for Services, or RS) to disseminate depression care for low-income ethnic minority women. METHODS: We conducted secondary analyses of intervention effects for largely low-income, minority women subsample (n = 595; 45.1% Latino and 45.4% African American) in a matched, clustered, randomized control trial conducted in 2 low-resource communities in Los Angeles, California, between 2010 and 2012. Outcomes assessed included mental health, socioeconomic factors, and service use at 6- and 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: Although we found no intervention difference for depressive symptoms, there were statistically significant effects for mental health quality of life, resiliency, homelessness risk, and financial difficulties at 6 months, as well as missed work days, self-efficacy, and care barriers at 12 months favoring CEP relative to RS. CEP increased use of outpatient substance abuse services and faith-based depression visits at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Engaging health care and social community programs may offer modest improvements on key functional and socioeconomic outcomes, reduce care barriers, and increase engagement in alternative depression services for low-income, predominantly ethnic minority women.

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