Crisis Beyond the Crises

MENA's Youth Unemployment Problem

Published in: Horizons: Journal of International Relations and Sustainable Development, Number 16 (Spring 2020), Pages 186–197

Posted on RAND.org on August 05, 2020

by Krishna B. Kumar

Read More

Access further information on this document at www.jstor.org

This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

Many countries in the Middle East have been suffering from the endemic disease of high youth unemployment, one of the main reasons behind the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011. Since then the situation has not improved, and has actually worsened in some countries. Uneven education quality, including technical and vocational education that has not furthered employment prospects, excessive regulation and inflexible labor laws, and ineffective job matching have given rise to this ongoing problem. Addressing these shortcomings, and making job creation for youth a key strategy for recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, is critical for the prosperity, stability, and security for the region.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation External publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

Our mission to help improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis is enabled through our core values of quality and objectivity and our unwavering commitment to the highest level of integrity and ethical behavior. To help ensure our research and analysis are rigorous, objective, and nonpartisan, we subject our research publications to a robust and exacting quality-assurance process; avoid both the appearance and reality of financial and other conflicts of interest through staff training, project screening, and a policy of mandatory disclosure; and pursue transparency in our research engagements through our commitment to the open publication of our research findings and recommendations, disclosure of the source of funding of published research, and policies to ensure intellectual independence. For more information, visit www.rand.org/about/principles.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.