Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

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COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus first identified in late 2019. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting nearly every facet of daily life and claiming lives across the globe.

As leaders grapple with how to respond, RAND experts seek to address and inform policy options and examine how different countries and communities are managing the crisis. Topics include health care capacity, telemedicine, social distancing, countering misinformation, economic effects, school closures, and online learning.

  • A voter completes his ballot on the day of the primary election in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. June 23, 2020, photo by Bryan Woolston/Reuters

    Report

    Voting in a Pandemic: What Americans Think About Safety, Election Integrity, and Preparedness

    Aug 27, 2020

    As states prepare to conduct elections during the COVID-19 crisis, what are voters' perceptions about safety, election integrity, and the readiness of local officials? And how might these perceptions affect voter turnout in November?

  • A person donates blood during a Red Cross and Arizona Diamondbacks baseball team blood drive at Chase Field in Phoenix, April 28, 2020, photo by Ross D. Franklin/AP Images

    Essay

    A Stable Blood Supply Is Critical in the COVID-19 Era

    Aug 27, 2020

    Millions of lives depend on the U.S. blood supply. But no one knows exactly how much blood is in the system at any given time, or whether it's enough to meet demand. The federal government has no way to collect that data, and hospitals don't share it with each other. What can be done to strengthen the system?

Explore Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

  • Election worker Gisela Alberg cleans a voting booth at Sonoma Elementary School during the primary election in Las Cruces, New Mexico, U.S., June 2, 2020, photo by Paul Ratje/Reuters

    Multimedia

    RAND Remote Series: Preparing for Elections During a Pandemic

    In this video conversation, RAND's Jennifer Kavanagh and Quentin Hodgson discuss the unique voting challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Sep 25, 2020

  • Members of parliament attend the first session of the newly elected parliament in Kutaisi, Georgia, November 18, 2016, photo by David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

    Commentary

    Georgia: From COVID-19 to a Critical Test of Democracy

    Georgia has successfully dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak but now must meet the task of conducting free, fair, and transparent parliamentary elections on October 31 and dealing with the economic impacts of the pandemic.

    Sep 23, 2020

  • Passengers on a flight, photo by vovashevchuk/Getty Images

    Report

    COVID-19 Was Spreading Globally Before It Was Declared a Pandemic

    Worldwide exports of COVID-19 cases began increasing at an accelerating rate on February 19, 2020. That was three weeks before the World Health Organization declared the pandemic. By the end of February, nearly 40 cases per week were spreading around the globe via air travel.

    Sep 22, 2020

  • Airplane about to land on a runway in Cape Town, South Africa, photo by brazzo/Getty Images

    Report

    Which African Countries Are Most at Risk of Importing COVID-19?

    U.S. forces in Africa are usually in areas of instability and thus have low levels of international air travel. Those regions are less likely to import COVID-19. The near-term driver of COVID-19 risk in Africa will more likely be the flow of travelers from Western Europe to Morocco, South Africa, and Algeria.

    Sep 22, 2020

  • Bottles containing a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, photo by Max Rode/Adobe Stock

    Report

    COVID-19 Vaccinations: Liability and Compensation Considerations for Policymakers

    Vaccine development is only one part of the challenge in creating an immunization campaign to stop the pandemic. Once a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is ready, liability and compensation issues could affect its distribution and administration.

    Sep 21, 2020

  • Reducing the Transmission of COVID-19 in Schools

    Multimedia

    Reducing the Transmission of COVID-19 in Schools

    RAND physician policy researcher Laura Faherty describes measures for reducing the transmission of COVID-19 in schools and the feasibility of implementing such measures.

    Sep 18, 2020

  • Blog

    Wildfires, America's Wealth Gap, Screening for COVID-19 at Work: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on the growing risk of wildfires, how Americans' incomes have grown (or not), workplace screenings for COVID-19 symptoms, and more.

    Sep 18, 2020

  • The front gate admissions supervisor checks employees' temperatures before the start of their shifts at Golfland Sunsplash water park in Mesa, Arizona, May 15, 2020, photo by Caitlin O'Hara/Reuters

    Report

    COVID-19 Screening in the Workplace

    Workplaces are checking for COVID-19 symptoms verbally, with a paper form or app, with onsite temperature checks, or by combining these approaches. Which are likely to detect infection and help employees feel safer? And which methods are safe, feasible, and protect employee privacy?

    Sep 17, 2020

  • A worried mother holding her baby while working, photo by damircudic/Getty Images

    Multimedia

    RAND 20/20: Tracking the Effects of COVID-19 on American Lives and Livelihoods

    In this remote video conversation, Shanthi Nataraj shares key research findings from RAND's American Life Panel (ALP) and discusses how the pandemic is affecting Americans' physical and mental health, their daily lives, and their employment and financial well-being.

    Sep 17, 2020

  • Sustainable Pharmaceutical Innovation

    Multimedia

    Sustainable Pharmaceutical Innovation for COVID-19 and Other Infectious Diseases

    Sonja Marjanovic, director of Healthcare Innovation, Industry and Policy at RAND Europe, describes the critical success criteria for innovation in infectious disease, antimicrobial, and vaccine research and development.

    Sep 16, 2020

  • Blog

    America's Declining Global Influence, COVID-19 and Schools, Pardoning Snowden: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on America's declining status on the world stage, why schools need long-term plans to address COVID-19, what Shinzo Abe's resignation means for the U.S.-Japan alliance, and more.

    Sep 11, 2020

  • Woman in a face mask having her temperature scanned, photo by whyframestudio/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Can Workers' Compensation Help Businesses Reopen More Safely?

    Workers' compensation typically does not cover common infectious diseases like COVID-19. But in the fight against the pandemic, state policymakers might take a fresh look at aspects of labor and business regulation that usually fade into the background and ask if modest changes hold any potential to reduce disease transmission.

    Sep 9, 2020

  • Periodical

    RAND Review: September-October 2020

    Feature stories explore how Pardee RAND is helping to shape the future of public policy through its Faculty Leaders Program; the safety and sustainability of the U.S. blood supply; and how telemedicine is changing the delivery of health care.

    Sep 8, 2020

  • The Future of the Pharmaceutical Industry (Crop)

    Multimedia

    The Future of the Pharmaceutical Industry

    RAND Europe's Sonja Marjanovic explains how changes in society have brought about opportunities for the pharmaceutical industry to innovate to better meet the needs of patients and health care systems.

    Sep 8, 2020

  • A child attends Miami Community Charter School for the first day of class in Flagler City, Florida, August 31, 2020, photo by Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/TNS/ABACA/Reuters

    Commentary

    Schools Need to Be Planning for the Next 9 Months, Not the Next 9 Weeks

    Schools cannot simply wait out this pandemic, nor will short-term planning and ad-hoc infrastructure get them successfully through this academic year. If schools are to minimize educational losses, large-scale investments should be made now.

    Sep 8, 2020

  • Blog

    The Evidence on Kids and COVID-19, China's Use of Big Data, Telemedicine: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on what we know (and what we don't) about kids and COVID-19, how China is using big data, the future of telemedicine, and more.

    Sep 4, 2020

  • Glass globe sitting on chalk board with crisis and policy written in chalk, photo by courtneyk/Getty Images

    Commentary

    COVID-19 and How Poor Planning Leads to a Lack of Freedom

    The pandemic has made Americans less free, confining us to our homes, and separating us from the people we love and the activities we value. This experience may help people learn the importance of planning to preserving and expanding freedom.

    Sep 4, 2020

  • Young Asian boy using laptop with headphones, photo by allensima/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Learning from School Leaders About SEL During a Time of Crisis

    It would be easy for social and emotional learning to fall by the wayside as school leaders work to address students' health, safety, and learning loss during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policymakers and funders should take seriously the perspectives and concerns that school leaders have shared.

    Sep 4, 2020

  • A sushi chef waits for diners as Miami-Dade County allows indoor servicing in restaurants after easing some lockdown measures in Miami, Florida, August 31, 2020, photo by Marco Bello/Reuters

    Commentary

    For Leisure and Hospitality, Weak Recovery Still Looks Like Recession

    By most measures, the workers hardest hit by pandemic shutdowns were those in the leisure and hospitality sector, which includes arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services. These jobs, which are still affected by government social distancing regulations, are not all likely to come back before the pandemic truly ends.

    Sep 4, 2020

  • Woman sitting on her couch having a virtual medical appointment on her laptop, photos by Agrobacter and SDI Productions/Getty Images

    Essay

    What Telemedicine Needs to Succeed Beyond COVID-19

    Virtual doctor visits have become part of the new normal. Since the first COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, Medicare and other payers have relaxed their rules to make it easier for patients to connect to care. But without permanent policy changes, physicians may not continue telemedicine services.

    Sep 2, 2020