German Strategy and Public Opinion After the Wall 1990-1993

by Ronald D. Asmus

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This report analyzes the results of a series of public opinion polls conducted for RAND since German unification and designed to identify longer-term public opinion trends on emerging national security issues in a unified Germany. It focuses on the results of the most recent poll, conducted in the fall of 1993, before the January 1994 NATO summit. The report also draws on analyses of survey work conducted in previous years to present a composite picture of trends in German public opinion on national security and alliance issues since German unification. It also integrates the results of interviews with a wide ranging set of German opinionmakers from political parties, public opinion experts, and senior officials in the Ministries of Foreign affairs and Defense on how to assess the implications of these findings.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation monograph report series. The monograph/report was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1993 to 2003. RAND monograph/reports presented major research findings that addressed the challenges facing the public and private sectors. They included executive summaries, technical documentation, and synthesis pieces.

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