Cover: Measurement of Consumer Engagement in HIV Care Quality Improvement

Measurement of Consumer Engagement in HIV Care Quality Improvement

Published Jun 29, 2023

by Thomas W. Concannon, George Timmins

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Research Questions

  1. What are the priorities of CQII and its partners for measuring consumer engagement in HIV care QI work?
  2. What available instruments and measures address these priorities?
  3. What are the attributes of those instruments and measures, including their psychometric properties, intended uses, and applicability to the HIV care QI context?

Engaging consumers in planning, delivering, assessing, and improving HIV care has long been a priority in the United States. The Ryan White CARE Act of 1990 (Care Act) was an early driver for establishing a culture of consumer engagement in HIV care quality improvement (QI). The Health Resources and Services Administration, which administers the Care Act, and its Center for Quality Improvement and Innovation (CQII) are interested in answering several questions about consumer engagement: How much engagement is being undertaken in HIV QI work, how good is engagement, what are the impacts of engagement, and how can engagement be improved? To help answer these questions, RAND Corporation researchers worked with HIV care providers and consumers to identify priorities and measures of consumer engagement in HIV care QI.

In this report, the researchers describe how they partnered with CQII to identify measurement priorities and existing measures for evaluating engagement in HIV care QI. A guiding premise of this collaborative effort was that different partners in the project have differing evaluation questions about engagement in HIV QI work. The goal was thus to develop a table of findings that identifies both the priorities of partners in HIV QI work and the available instruments and measures that address those priorities. The resulting prioritized table of findings may be considered a living document to be used by all parties to document, track, discuss, evaluate, and report on engagement using a shared list of priorities, instruments, and measures.

Key Findings

  • The table of findings can be considered a taxonomy of the measurement of engagement in HIV care QI. The table aligns partner-identified measurement constructs with existing instruments and measures.
  • Partner-identified measurement priorities may evolve over time. The table of findings may be used by all partners to document, track, discuss, evaluate, and report on engagement using a shared list of priorities, instruments, and measures.
  • The prioritization of measurement constructs prepares partners for the next phase of measure development, in which instruments and measures that address the priorities may be identified, tested, and refined.

Research conducted by

This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration and carried out within the Quality Measurement and Improvement Program in RAND Health Care.

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