Prenatal Health Care

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Women who receive prenatal health care generally benefit from fewer medical complications during pregnancy, and their babies also tend to experience a lower risk of health problems during infancy and long-term benefits throughout their growth and development. RAND research related to prenatal health care includes studies on infant mortality, low birth weight, prenatal substance use, and prenatal care and nutrition for low-income women.

  • Fadamatu Musa, a Boko Haram insurgency survivor, is a beneficiary of supply of Super Cereal Plus, one of the specialized nutritious products that WFP uses to fight malnutrition, photo by Samuel Ochai/DG ECHO

    Research Brief

    Reducing Child Deaths in Nigeria

    A program paid expectant mothers in Nigeria to use prenatal, delivery, and postnatal health services, resulting in an increase in use of care. This led to a substantial decrease in child deaths. Scaling this program up across Nigeria could reduce stillbirths by 85,000 annually.

    Jun 22, 2020

  • Alysia Davis while pregnant with her husband, photo courtesy of Alysia Davis

    Essay

    Reducing Disparities in Infant Mortality: Using Big Data to Help Babies at Risk

    Black babies in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania—and across America—face much higher mortality rates than white babies. Researchers pulled together thousands of data points on more than 150,000 births to better predict who is at risk and how to help them.

    Jul 1, 2021

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