Daniel B. Ginsberg

Photo of Daniel Ginsberg
Associate Director, Forces and Resources Policy Center; Senior International and Defense Researcher
Washington Office

Education

M.A. in strategic studies, Johns Hopkins University; B.A. in political science, University of Michigan

Overview

Daniel Ginsberg is the associate director of the Forces and Resources Policy Center of the RAND National Security Research Division, and a senior international and defense researcher at the RAND Corporation. His research has centered on organizational assessments of federal agencies, military reserves, and force morale with a focus on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI).

Prior to joining RAND, Ginsberg was a senior advisor and project director with the National Academy of Public Administration. He led or provided subject expertise to studies on employee engagement at the U.S. Secret Service, the small Unmanned Aerial Systems federal registration regulation, DEI at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, the personnel system of the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the science analysis and advice available to the U.S. Congress.   

From 2009 to 2013, he served as the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. In that role, he led the policy development team for the Department of Defense’s 2010 comprehensive review of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. Before then, Ginsberg served for a decade as the senior defense policy advisor to U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont. He coordinated the bipartisan U.S. Senate National Guard Caucus. He is also a former research assistant for the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee during the chairmanship of U.S. Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia. 

Ginsberg has an M.A. in strategic studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and an B.A. in political science from the University of Michigan.

Commentary

  • U.S. Marine Corps General, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has a meet and greet with airmen on Yokota Air Base, Japan, November 4, 2015

    Investing in Military Human Capital

    A new effort to review the military's personnel system will focus initially on policies to assign, evaluate, and promote service members. To truly address systematic challenges, however, the scope will need to widen to include how the various military services might size, structure, and support key missions.

    Nov 5, 2015 Military Times