The 1995 Agenda for the National Center for Research in Vocational Education

Published in: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Report no. MDS-990 (Berkeley, CA : National Center for Research in Vocational Education, University of California at Berkeley, July 1995), 66 p

Posted on RAND.org on July 01, 1995

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This document outlines the National Center for Research Vocational Education's 1995 agenda. The agenda is divided into two parts. Part 1 summarizes the center's plans for research and development activities on the following six themes: the economic context of vocational education (VE); institutions, "systems," governance, and policy; effective curriculum development and teaching practices; students; personnel; and accountability and assessment. First, recent developments related to each theme and premises of the agenda for each theme are discussed. Next, project proposals are presented for each theme area. Each proposal contains the following: theme area; project title; project director; key words; and brief project description (including project purpose, first-year goals and activities, intended products, primary audience, and/or avenues for dissemination). Part 2 summarizes the center's plans regarding the following dissemination and training activities: development/implementation of dissemination and professional outreach programs, establishment of an office of student services, publication of research syntheses under the title "CenterFocus," presentation of a skills standard conference, development of a practitioner guide to new curricula and teaching on education for work, and provision of technical assistance to the Vocational Education Consortium of the Southern Regional Education Board.

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