Provider-related Barriers to Rapid HIV Testing in U.S. Urban Non-Profit Community Clinics, Community-Based Organizations (CBOs) and Hospitals

Published in: AIDS and Behavior, v. 14, no. 3, June 2010, p. 697-707

Posted on RAND.org on January 01, 2010

by Laura M. Bogart, Devery Howerton, James Lange, Claude Messan Setodji, Kirsten Becker, David J. Klein, Steven M. Asch

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We examined provider-reported barriers to rapid HIV testing in U.S. urban non-profit community clinics, community-based organizations (CBOs), and hospitals. 12 primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs; three per region) were sampled randomly, with sampling weights proportional to AIDS case reports. Across PMSAs, all 671 hospitals and a random sample of 738 clinics/CBOs were telephoned for a survey on rapid HIV test availability. Of the 671 hospitals, 172 hospitals were randomly selected for barriers questions, for which 158 laboratory and 136 department staff were eligible and interviewed in 2005. Of the 738 clinics/CBOs, 276 were randomly selected for barriers questions, 206 were reached, and 118 were eligible and interviewed in 2005-2006. In multivariate models, barriers regarding translation of administrative/quality assurance policies into practice were significantly associated with rapid HIV testing availability. For greater rapid testing diffusion, policies are needed to reduce administrative barriers and provide quality assurance training to non-laboratory staff.

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