Measuring Teaching Quality Using Student Achievement Tests

Lessons from Educators' Responses to No Child Left Behind

Published in: Understanding Teacher Effects on Instruction and Achievement / Edited by Sean Kelly (New York, New York: Teachers College Press, 2012), Chapter 3, p. 49-75

by Laura S. Hamilton

Recent educational reforms have promoted accountability systems which attempt to identify teacher effects on student outcomes and hold teachers accountable for producing learning gains. But in the complex world of classrooms, it may be difficult to attribute "success" or "failure" to teachers. In this timely collection, leading education scholars challenge market-based models of school improvement and argue that merely holding teachers accountable for scores on end-of-the-year exams will not lead to educational improvement.

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