Examining the Sustainment of the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach in Community Addiction Treatment Settings

Protocol for a Longitudinal Mixed Method Study

Published in: Implementation Sciences, v. 9, no. 104, Aug. 2014, p. 1-11

Posted on RAND.org on August 01, 2014

by Sarah B. Hunter, Lynsay Ayer, Bing Han, Bryan R. Garner, Susan H Godley

Read More

Access further information on this document at Implementation Sciences

This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

BACKGROUND: Although evidence-based treatments are considered the gold standard for clinical practice, it is widely recognized that evidence-based treatment implementation in real world practice settings has been limited. To address this gap, the federal government provided three years of funding, training and technical assistance to 84 community-based treatment programs to deliver an evidence-based treatment called the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA). Little is known about whether such efforts lead to long-term A-CRA sustainment after the initial funding ends. METHODS/DESIGN: We will use a longitudinal mixed method data analytic approach to characterize sustainment over time and to examine the factors associated with the extent to which A-CRA is sustained. We will use implementation data collected during the funding period (e.g., organizational functioning, staff certification rates and penetration) and supplement it with additional data collected during the proposed project period regarding implementation quality and the hypothesized predictors of sustainment (i.e., inner and outer contextual variables) collected over three waves from 2013 to 2015 representing program sustainment up to five years post-initial funding. DISCUSSION: Gaining a better understanding of the factors that influence the evidence-based treatment sustainment may lead to more effective dissemination strategies and ultimately improve the quality of care being delivered in community-based addiction treatment settings.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation external publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.