Air Reserve Forces Personnel Study

Vol. I, The Personnel Structure and Posture of the Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve

by Bernard D. Rostker

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Examines the reserve personnel system and develops personnel flows. Career airmen appear to be in short supply. About 40 percent of authorized positions are being filled by low-grade airmen. Non-prior service airmen on their first tour of service constitute about 73 percent of the Air Reserve Force; only 57 percent for the regular Air Force. A majority of personnel, after eight years of service, are civilian technicians who tend to remain in the reserves past normal retirement. Six major personnel flows determine the personnel posture of the Air Reserve Forces. Estimation of entry flows and service continuation rates were obtained by matching Guard and Reserve personnel records and active Air Force loss records for the FY 1970 period. Projections show yearly accession requirements are between 13,000 and 18,000 airmen.

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