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Part 1

Section I - III

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Part 2

Section IV (Part 1 of 3)

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Part 3

Section IV (Part 2 of 3)

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Part 4

Section IV (Part 3 of 3), Author Index

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One of three reports collating research on the effects of television on human behavior. This volume contains summaries of almost 450 studies and other documents selected on the basis of contemporary interest from a large pool of 2,300 items. The summaries represent critical appraisals. A user-oriented format highlights principal findings or conclusions. To avoid disguising the wide relevance of many entries, access is through eleven specialized reference lists (for titles, see abstract of R-1746) in which entries are cited wherever relevant. As a result, the user can construct eleven topic-focused but overlapping sets of material for analysis and review. The summaries are prefaced by an extensive analysis of methodological issues and trends which employs the summaries for illustrative purposes. In order to further aid the reader, the items were awarded Michelin-like stars (zero to three) for "interest at the present time" by a jury of social scientists. (See also R-1746, R-1748, P-5412.)

This report is part of the RAND Corporation report series. The report was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1948 to 1993 that represented the principal publication documenting and transmitting RAND's major research findings and final research.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.