A Comparison of the Capital Costs of Light Water Reactor and Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Power Plants

by W. E. Mooz, Sidney Siegel

Download

Download eBook for Free

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 2.3 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 FormatList Price Price
Add to Cart Paperback74 pages $25.00 $20.00 20% Web Discount

One input into an overall study designed to estimate the relative costs of generating electricity by light water reactors (LWR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The present study began with an analysis of cost estimates from three firms experienced in the field. With these data, the authors estimated a "current" cost for a mature LMFBR. Next, two scenarios were postulated for the deployment of nuclear power during the next 40 years. In one, the social and political environment vigorously encourages nuclear power; in the other, nuclear deployment is held to a modest level by continued social and political concerns about current and future perceived hazards. The scenarios illustrate the major uncertainties and costs. Results are given as sets of capital costs and LMFBR/LWR cost ratios representative of each scenario.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation Report series. The report was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1948 to 1993 that represented the principal publication documenting and transmitting RAND's major research findings and final research.

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited; linking directly to this product page is encouraged. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial purposes. For information on reprint and reuse permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.