Democracy and economic change in India.

by George Rosen

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A study of the political revolution in India in 1947 and the political, social, and economic changes that have followed. While greatest stress is on the economy, the author also aims to determine the relationship between the political and economic changes, particularly in the policy field where the relationship is closest. The author describes the established structure of Indian society at the time of independence, classifying the major economic and social groups within rural and urban India at that time. The next section describes the political changes arising from independence and from the ideological and institutional changes associated with it. This is followed by the economic section of the study, which examines the broad economic policies and their results from 1947 to 1961, estimating the economic gains and losses to the various class and caste groups. Next is a discussion of India's current economic problems and the implications of alternative policies for solving them. A final section applies certain generalizations on the relationship between political reform and economic change to other countries now in the process of development. A study of the political revolution in India in 1947 and the political, social, and economic changes that have followed. While greatest stress is on the economy, the author also aims to determine the relationship between the political and economic changes, particularly in the policy field where the relationship is closest. The author describes the established structure of Indian society at the time of independence, classifying the major economic and social groups within rural and urban India at that time. The next section describes the political changes arising from independence and from the ideological and institutional changes associated with it. This is followed by the economic section of the study, which examines the broad economic policies and their results from 1947 to 1961, estimating the economic gains and losses to the various class and caste groups. Next is a discussion of India's current economic problems and the implications of alternative policies for solving them. A final section applies certain generalizations on the relationship between political reform and economic change to other countries now in the process of development. 344 pp.

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