Cover: Integrating Active and Reserve Component Staff Organizations

Integrating Active and Reserve Component Staff Organizations

Improving the Chances of Success

Published Feb 11, 2019

by Laurinda L. Rohn, Agnes Gereben Schaefer, Gregory A. Schumacher, Jennifer Kavanagh, Caroline Baxter, Amy Grace Donohue

Download

Download eBook for Free

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.6 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 Format Price
Add to Cart Paperback148 pages $24.00

Research Question

  1. What factors could increase or decrease the likelihood of success in integrating active and reserve component staff organizations?

Integrating active and reserve component military staff organizations — for the purpose of achieving greater efficiency, making standards and practices more consistent, or ensuring commonality of purpose — can present significant challenges. A RAND Corporation study undertook a literature review and analysis of several case studies to examine factors that could increase the likelihood of success in such organizational integrations. The resulting best practices can serve as a framework for undertaking and assessing these integrations.

Key Finding

The Literature on Organizational Change and Cases Studies Suggest Several Best Practices That Can Improve the Chances of Successfully Integrating Active and Reserve Component Staff Organizations

  • Those best practices are as follows: Establish the need and the vision for change; create a coalition to support the change; communicate the vision; develop an implementation strategy, including goals and measures; link the vision and structure; embed the changes in the new culture; manage the integration of cultures; maintain momentum; remember the importance of people; assess progress and adjust accordingly; establish unity of command; address statutory barriers; and collocate active and reserve component personnel in integrated organizations.

Recommendations

  • Establish the need and the vision for change. Articulate the need for change, and adopt a clear vision for the integration.
  • Create a coalition to support the change.
  • Communicate the vision. Communicate the vision for the integration regularly.
  • Develop an implementation strategy, including goals and measures. Develop a strategy for implementing the integration that includes clear goals and measures of success.
  • Link the vision and the structure. Ensure that the planned organizational structure is consistent with the vision for the integration.
  • Embed the changes in the new culture.
  • Manage the integration of cultures. Work to develop a total force culture in the integrated organization.
  • Maintain momentum.
  • Remember the importance of people.
  • Assess progress and adjust accordingly.
  • Establish unity of command. Establish unity of command to the greatest extent possible in the integrated organization.
  • Address statutory barriers. Explicitly consider statutory barriers and potential work-arounds.
  • Collocate active and reserve component personnel in integrated organizations.

This research was sponsored by the Office of Reserve Integration within the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness and conducted within the Forces and Resources Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community.

This report is part of the RAND research report series. RAND reports present research findings and objective analysis that address the challenges facing the public and private sectors. All RAND reports undergo rigorous peer review to ensure high standards for research quality and objectivity.

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited; linking directly to this product page is encouraged. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial purposes. For information on reprint and reuse permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.

RAND is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.