Natural Hazards

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Losses resulting from natural hazards—including floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, and wildfires—cost billions of dollars each year. RAND research has shown how long-term loss-reduction strategies and disaster preparedness could improve the resilience of communities and infrastructure in the face of natural disasters, resulting in less property damage and reduced rebuilding costs.

  • Aerial view of a flooded town, with roads covered in brown flood water. Photo by Aranga87 / Getty Images

    Report

    Assessing Risk to the National Critical Functions as a Result of Climate Change

    National Critical Functions (NCFs) are government and private-sector functions so vital that their disruption would debilitate security, the economy, public health, or safety. Researchers developed a risk management framework to assess and manage the risk that climate change poses to the NCFs and use the framework to assess 27 priority NCFs.

    Apr 5, 2022

  • Two women await the arrival of U.S Border Patrol riverine agents in an air boat to pick them up as they are evacuated from a flooded subdivision near Houston, Texas, in the wake of Hurricane Harvey August 30, 2017.

    Report

    Assessing Social Equity in Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery

    In this webinar, senior social scientist Melissa Finucane reviews the complex nature of social equity—including contextual, procedural, and distributional equity dimensions—and how a robust, evidence-based approach is needed to measure progress toward equity in disaster contexts.

    Nov 16, 2021

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