Courtney A. Gidengil

Photo of Courtney Gidengil
Director, Boston Office; Senior Physician Policy Researcher
Boston Office

Education

M.D., McGill University; M.P.H. in clinical effectiveness, Harvard School of Public Health; B.Sc. in psychology, McGill University

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Courtney A. Gidengil is director of RAND's Boston office and a senior physician policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. She is board certified in both general pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases. Dr. Gidengil trained as a resident in pediatrics at Hasbro Children's Hospital and Brown University. She completed further training in pediatric infectious diseases at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, where she joined the division as faculty in 2009. Her research training includes the Harvard Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship Program. Dr. Gidengil earned her M.P.H. in clinical effectiveness from the Harvard School of Public Health and both her B.Sc. in psychology and M.D. from McGill University.

Concurrent Non-RAND Positions

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Commentary

  • A woman waits in front of a closed and shuttered storefront amid the COVID-19 outbreak in Lynn, Massachusetts, May 4, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Reopening America—The Health and Economic Trade-Offs: Q&A with RAND Experts

    Local and state officials are thinking through whether, when, and how to lift social-distancing restrictions. We asked three RAND researchers about the complex problem of reopening.

    May 4, 2020

  • New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks during a COVID-19 news conference at the Javits Center, New York City, March 27, 2020, photo by Jeenah Moon/Reuters

    Who Calls the Shots During a Pandemic, the U.S. Government or States? Q&A with RAND Experts

    The tension between the federal government and state and local authorities has highlighted a fundamental challenge of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic: Who's in charge?

    Apr 16, 2020 The RAND Blog

  • The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C., January 19, 2020, photo by Will Dunham/Reuters

    What If the Supreme Court Strikes Down the ACA During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

    With COVID-19 spreading across the United States, the fate of the Affordable Care Act is once again up in the air, hanging on the outcome of a Supreme Court case. Should the law be overturned, upwards of 20 million people could lose their health insurance during one of the deadliest pandemics in modern history.

    Apr 3, 2020 The Hill

  • A woman visits her mother who has tested positive for coronavirus at a Seattle-area nursing home, the epicenter of one of the biggest outbreaks in the United States, in Kirkland, Washington, March 11, 2020, photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

    U.S. COVID-19 Cases on the Rise: Q&A with RAND Experts

    COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, is now in all 50 states. And more and more U.S. cases and deaths are being reported. As orders to close schools and restaurants take effect across America, RAND researchers answer some questions about the crisis.

    Mar 18, 2020

  • CDC staff support the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) response in the their Emergency Operations Center in Atlanta, Georgia, March 10, 2020, photo by James Gathany/CDC/Reuters

    Estimates of COVID-19's Fatality Rate Might Change. And Then Change Again.

    With infections of the new coronavirus confirmed in countries around the world, people are following the daily tally of COVID-19 cases, wondering exactly how lethal this new disease is. The truth is, it's hard to know.

    Mar 11, 2020 The RAND Blog

  • A boy getting a vaccination

    On Vaccines, Trump Should Rely on Science

    Research has proven that vaccines are extremely safe and effective. The public health implications of questioning this are serious. America should take every opportunity to protect kids by vaccinating them against every vaccine-preventable disease.

    Jan 25, 2017 The Health Care Blog

  • A child receives polio vaccination during an anti-polio campaign on the outskirts of Jalalabad, Afghanistan

    An Outbreak of Outbreaks

    Lately, stories about outbreaks seem to be spreading faster than the diseases themselves. An outbreak of measles in Ohio is just part of an 18-year high of U.S. cases. Meanwhile, polio continues to circulate in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria, while spreading to other countries, like Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Syria.

    Jun 11, 2014 The Health Care Blog

Publications