Jeffrey W. Hornung

Political Scientist
Washington Office

Education

Ph.D. in political science, George Washington University; M.A. in international relations (Japan studies), Johns Hopkins University-School of Advanced International Studies; B.A. in political science; international affairs, Marquette University

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Jeffrey Hornung is a political scientist at the RAND Corporation. He specializes in Japanese security and foreign policies, East Asian security issues, maritime security, and U.S. foreign and defense policies in the Asia-Pacific region, including its alliances.

Prior to joining RAND in April 2017, Hornung was the Fellow for the Security and Foreign Affairs Program at Sasakawa USA from 2015 until 2017. Concurrently, he was Project Director for the Maritime Awareness Project. From 2010 until 2015, Hornung worked as an Associate Professor for the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, a Department of Defense education facility in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Hornung has written extensively about Japanese security and foreign policy issues and broader Northeast Asia security issues for numerous media, policy, and academic outlets. This includes Washington Quarterly, Asian Survey, Foreign Affairs, Washington Post, CNN, and many others.

Hornung received his Ph.D. in political science from George Washington University, where he wrote his thesis on Japanese decision-making to send the Self-Defense Forces to Iraq in the 1991 Gulf War and 2003 Iraq War. During 2005-2006, Hornung was also a visiting scholar at the University of Tokyo where he conducted his doctoral research as a Fulbright Fellow. He also holds an M.A. in international relations with a concentration in Japan Studies from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

Selected Publications

Jeffrey Reeves, Jeffrey Hornung, Kerry Lynn Nankivell, Chinese-Japanese Competition and the East Asian Security Complex: Vying for Influence, Routledge, 2017 (forthcoming)

Jeffrey W. Hornung, Managing the U.S.-Japan Alliance: An Examination of Structural Linkages in the Security Relationship, Sasakawa USA, 2017

Jeffrey W. Hornung, The U.S. Military Laydown On Guam: Progress Amid Challenges, Sasakawa USA, 2017

Jeffrey W. Hornung and Mike M. Mochizuki, "Japan: Still An Exceptional U.S. Ally," Washington Quarterly, 39(1):95-116, 2016

Jeffrey Hornung, "Japan's Pushback of China," Washington Quarterly, 38(1):167-183, 2015

Jeffrey W. Hornung, Modeling a Stronger U.S.-Japan Alliance: Assessing U.S. Alliance Structures, Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2015

Jeffrey W. Hornung, "Japan's Growing Hard Hedge Against China," Asian Security, 10(2):97-122, 2014

Honors & Awards

  • Fulbright Fellowship, The Council for International Exchange of Scholars

Commentary

  • Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (right) and lawmaker Shinjiro Koizumi part ways at the Parliament in Tokyo, September 28, 2017

    Abe's Victory and Constitutional Revision

    After Japan's election, observers immediately began speculating about its impact on constitutional reform. While parties in favor of constitutional revision have secured enough seats to pass the legislative hurdle needed to revise Japan's basic law, the road ahead is much more complicated.

    Oct 31, 2017 Foreign Affairs

  • A Japan Self-Defense Forces soldier (L) talks with a U.S. Forces soldier during a drill to mobilise JSDF's PAC-3 missile unit in response to a recent missile launch by North Korea, at U.S. Air Force Yokota Air Base in Fussa on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, August 29, 2017

    Why Japan Needs Long-Range Strike Capabilities

    Japan's pacifist constitution allows it to exercise force only when its survival is threatened and there are no other means to repel the attack. But North Korea's advancing military capabilities have drastically changed the threat environment. Japan no longer has the luxury to be complacent about its security threats.

    Oct 23, 2017 Defense One

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (left) delivers remarks on North Korea, accompanied by U.S. President Donald Trump at the Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, February 11, 2017

    Japan's Election Matters for U.S. Interests

    What happens in Japan's election carries enormous consequence for the United States and its interests in the region. U.S. Asia policy begins and ends with America's critical alliance with Japan.

    Oct 21, 2017 Newsweek

  • Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers take part in  an annual training session near Mount Fuji at Higashifuji training field in Gotemba, west of Tokyo, August 25, 2016

    Giving Japan a Military

    After 70 years, Japan may finally be on the cusp of acquiring its own military. Legally, that is. Prime Minister Abe has proposed a change to Japan's constitution to give legal standing to the Self-Defense Forces, and it's long overdue.

    Jun 20, 2017 The Japan Times

  • United Nations Mission in South Sudan peacekeepers from Japan assemble a drainage pipe at Tomping camp in Juba, January 7, 2014

    Japan's Mistaken South Sudan Withdrawal

    Being a proactive contributor to peace involves risk if a country is serious about gaining real-world experience. Pulling out of South Sudan deprives Japan's Self-Defense Force of crucial operational experience and sends a confusing message to the United States and the international community.

    Jun 8, 2017 The Diplomat

  • War veterans and commanding officers in a military parade celebrate the 60th anniversary of the signing of the truce of the Korean War, in Pyongyang, August 3, 2013

    End the Korean War, Finally

    Sixty-four years ago, the Korean War was suspended by a cease-fire. A peace treaty was never signed. Standing ready to formally end this old war may be the key to dismantling North Korea's nuclear program without starting a new one.

    Jun 8, 2017 New York Times

Publications

  • President Barack Obama, left, and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, right, during their bilateral meeting at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, Sept. 5, 2013

    Multimedia

    U.S.–Japan Alliance Conference Series Proceedings

    In a series of conferences, U.S. and Japanese experts explored the challenges for the U.S.-Japan alliance associated with China's military modernization drive and increasing foreign policy assertiveness.

    Jan 21, 2015