Factors Associated with Condom Use Among HIV Clients in Stable Relationships with Partners at Varying Risk for HIV in Uganda

Published in: AIDS and Behavior, v. 14, no. 5, Oct. 2010, p. 1055-1065

Posted on RAND.org on December 31, 2009

by Glenn Wagner, Ian Holloway, Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar, Gery W. Ryan, Cissy Kityo, Peter Mugyenyi

Read More

Access further information on this document at www.springerlink.com

This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

In Africa, HIV infections occur mostly in stable relationships, yet little is known about the determinants of condom use in this context. We examined condom use among 272 coupled HIV clients in Uganda who had just screened for ART eligibility; 128 had an HIV-positive partner, 47 HIV-negative, and 97 a partner with unknown HIV status. Sixty-six percent reported unprotected sex with their partner over the past 6 months (57-70% across the three subgroups). Multiple variables among socioeconomic characteristics, physical health, social support, and psychosocial adjustment were correlated with condom use in bivariate analysis, but in multivariate analysis, condom use self-efficacy was the only predictor of condom use in the total sample and subgroups; church attendance and physical functioning were also predictors among unknown status couples. This analysis reveals high rates of unprotected sex among coupled HIV clients, regardless of partner's HIV status, and suggests multiple targets for prevention.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation external publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.