Economic Evaluation of Coastal Land Loss in Louisiana

Published in: Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (Louisiana) website

Posted on RAND.org on July 19, 2017

by Stephen R. Barnes, Craig A. Bond, Nicholas Burger, Katherine Anania, Aaron Strong, Sarah Weilant, Stephanie Virgets

Download eBook for Free

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 7.4 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Read More

Access further information on this document at coastal.la.gov

This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

The two-year study conducted by the LSU Economics and Policy Research Group and the RAND Corporation quantified economic impacts of ongoing and future land loss in Louisiana, demonstrating a need and justification for Coastal Master Plan project expenditures that can save billions during future storm events. The report examines potential economic implications of Louisiana's land loss through a spatial analysis that layered future land loss and storm surge scenarios from the 2012 Coastal Master Plan onto today's economy. The researcher's approach examined both fixed assets and flows of economic activity occurring within the coastal zone as well as their cascading effects throughout the state and the nation.

Research conducted by

This report is part of the RAND Corporation external publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.