Cover: Staffing At-Risk School Districts in Texas

Staffing At-Risk School Districts in Texas

Problems and Prospects

Published 1999

by Sheila Nataraj Kirby, Scott Naftel, Mark Berends

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Teacher supply and demand issues are of critical importance as our society enters the 21st century. Over the next decade, about two million new teachers will be needed largely because of a dramatic increase in enrollments and high attrition rates as an aging teacher workforce becomes eligible for retirement. It is important to understand where these teachers will come from and where they will teach. This is especially important for high-poverty districts that tend to have large numbers of students at risk of educational failure. These districts, which also tend to be disproportionately minority, are already facing difficulty recruiting and retaining qualified teachers. Given this, it is important to ask whether we will be able to staff high-risk and high-minority districts. National data show that these districts are staffed predominantly by minority teachers. Thus, the answer to the question of who will staff these districts revolves around whether we will have enough minority teachers. This report aims to fill part of this information gap by examining demand and supply of minority teachers in Texas.

The research described in this report was supported by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement's Field Initiated Studies Grant Program under Grant No. R306F60175 and performed under the auspices of RAND Education.

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