Cover: The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations in Long-Term Human Recovery After Disaster

The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations in Long-Term Human Recovery After Disaster

Reflections From Louisiana Four Years After Hurricane Katrina

Published Sep 18, 2009

by Anita Chandra, Joie D. Acosta

Download

Download eBook for Free

Full Document

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.6 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Summary Only

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.1 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 Format Price
Add to Cart Paperback32 pages $20.00

In the four years since Hurricane Katrina, volunteers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have been instrumental in supporting community efforts to recover and rebuild from the devastation in the Gulf States region. The period also provides a case study of the complex process of human recovery and the resource and policy constraints on NGO involvement in these efforts. Human recovery is the process of rebuilding social and daily routines and support networks that foster physical and mental health and well-being. To capture lessons learned for improving human recovery efforts in future disasters, RAND researchers conducted a facilitated discussion with NGO leaders representing a broad spectrum of organizations in Louisiana. The results of that discussion highlight ongoing challenges facing NGOs in terms of appropriate recovery models and financing, NGO-government coordination, and processes to formalize and operationalize NGO roles and responsibilities. Drawing on these lessons, this paper also offers a series of state and federal policy recommendations and a set of possible future research directions to assess and address barriers to long-term human recovery efforts.

Research conducted by

This paper results from the RAND Corporation's continuing program of self-initiated research. Support for such research is provided, in part, by the generosity of RAND's donors and by the fees earned on client-funded research. The research was conducted within RAND Health under the auspices of the RAND Gulf States Policy Institute (RGSPI) in partnership with the Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations, the Louisiana Family Recovery Corps, and the Louisiana Association of United Ways.

This report is part of the RAND occasional paper series. RAND occasional papers may include an informed perspective on a timely policy issue, a discussion of new research methodologies, essays, a paper presented at a conference, or a summary of work in progress. All RAND occasional papers undergo rigorous peer review to help ensure that they meet high standards for research quality and objectivity.

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited; linking directly to this product page is encouraged. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial purposes. For information on reprint and reuse permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.

RAND is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.