Computer-Mediated Work

Individual and Organizational Impact in One Corporate Headquarters

by Tora K. Bikson, Cathy Stasz, Don Mankin

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This report describes how computer-based information technology was introduced into one white-collar work setting, and explores the consequences to employees and the organization. Several years ago, the company studied here made a substantial commitment to implementing advanced information tools. Its success in this innovation effort can be explained in terms of three components: characteristics of the organization, its information technology, and its implementation program. The organization is characterized by a receptivity to the implementation of advanced information technology; its information system is mission-focused, user-driven, and designed for change; and it carefully plans its implementation strategy and commits substantial resources to it. This company's experience suggests that the implementation of innovative information technologies can yield both economic performance payoffs and human resources benefits.

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