Cover: Narrative Comments About Pediatric Inpatient Experiences Yield Substantial Information Beyond Answers to Closed-Ended CAHPS Survey Questions

Narrative Comments About Pediatric Inpatient Experiences Yield Substantial Information Beyond Answers to Closed-Ended CAHPS Survey Questions

Published in: Journal of Pediatric Nursing (2024). DOI: 10.1016/j.pedn.2024.02.016

Posted on rand.org May 1, 2024

by Denise D. Quigley, Marc N. Elliott, Mary Ellen Slaughter, Carlos F. Lerner, Ron D. Hays

Purpose

Adults' comments on patient experience surveys explain variation in provider ratings, with negative comments providing more actionable information than positive comments. We investigate if narrative comments on the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) survey of inpatient pediatric care (Child HCAHPS) account for global perceptions of the hospital beyond that explained by reports about specific aspects of care.

Methods

We analyzed 545 comments from 927 Child HCAHPS surveys completed by parents and guardians of hospitalized children with at least a 24-h hospital stay from July 2017 to December 2020 at an urban children's hospital. Comments were coded for valence (positive/negative/mixed) and actionability and used to predict Overall Hospital Rating and Willingness to Recommend the Hospital along with Child HCAHPS composite scores.

Results

Comments were provided more often by White and more educated respondents. Negative comments and greater actionability of comments were significantly associated with Child HCAHPS global rating measures, controlling for responses to closed-ended questions, and child and respondent characteristics. Each explained an additional 8% of the variance in respondents' overall hospital ratings and an additional 5% in their willingness to recommend the hospital.

Conclusions

Child HCAHPS narrative comment data provide significant additional information about what is important to parents and guardians during inpatient pediatric care beyond closed-ended composites.

Practice Implications

Quality improvement efforts should include a review of narrative comments alongside closed-ended responses to help identify ways to improve inpatient care experiences. To promote health equity, comments should be encouraged for racial-and-ethnic minority patients and those with less educational attainment.

Research conducted by

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