Health Care Access

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Access to health care refers to the ease with which an individual can obtain needed medical services. RAND research has examined the social, cultural, economic, and geographic factors that influence health care access worldwide; the effects of changes in access; and the relationship between access and health for specific U.S. populations—including racial and ethnic minorities, people with limited English proficiency, the uninsured, the elderly, children, and veterans.

  • A man waits for the subway at the Times Square stop in New York, December 19, 2012, photo by Andrew Burton/Reuters

    Report

    How Available and Accessible Are Mental Health Services in NYC?

    Across the United States and in New York City in particular, the use of mental health services is low and care is not equitably distributed. Non-Hispanic white individuals are more likely to seek care than non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic individuals. Provider shortages and a lack of integration across service settings are two barriers, and COVID-19 exacerbated these challenges.

    Jun 22, 2022

  • People line up for COVID-19 vaccines and booster doses at a McDonald's in Chicago, Illinois, December 21, 2021, photo by Jim Vondruska/Reuters

    Report

    Hyper-Local Strategies Are Working to Promote Vaccination Equity

    The Equity-First Vaccination Initiative, launched in summer 2021, has already made progress in reducing racial/ethnic disparities in U.S. COVID-19 vaccination rates. Hyper-local, community-led strategies are helping to increase vaccine confidence and access for communities that identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color.

    Jan 28, 2022

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