Cover: Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Frequently Associated Comorbidities

Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Frequently Associated Comorbidities

Published in: Quality of Life Research, v. 22, no. 7, Sep. 2013, p. 1537-1541

Posted on rand.org Sep 1, 2013

by Anne M. Suskind, Sandra H. Berry, Marika Booth, Marc N. Elliott, Ron D. Hays, Brett Ewing, J. Quentin Clemens

PURPOSE: To estimate the association of chronic non-urologic conditions [i.e., fibromyalgia (FM), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)] with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). METHODS: A total of 276 women with established diagnoses of IC/BPS completed a telephone interview which included demographics, self-reported medical conditions, the SF-36 health survey, and the interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 45.1 (SD 15.9) years, and 83 % of the subjects were white. Mean values for the SF-36 Physical Component Score (PCS) and Mental Component Score (MCS) means were 39 (SD 14) and 45 (SD 12), respectively, indicating significant HRQOL reductions. Mean ICSI score was 11.27 (SD = 4.86). FM and IBS were significantly associated with worse SF-36 scores: −8 points on the PCS (p < 0.001) and −6 points on the MCS (p < 0.001). CFS and the presence of other pelvic conditions (overactive bladder, vulvodynia, endometriosis) were not significantly associated with SF-36 PCS and MCS scores. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with IC/BPS, the presence of FM, CFS, and IBS has a significant association with HRQOL, equivalent in impact to the bladder symptoms themselves. These results emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with IC/BPS and other conditions.

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