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This online tool shows the effect that improving diet quality in the United States could have on health and economic outcomes, such as the prevalence of diet-related illness, health care spending, and labor force participation, over a 30-year period. The user can explore the effects of a dietary improvement on several outcomes, across different metrics and population sub-groups.

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This research was prepared for Pharmavite, LLC and conducted by the Social and Behavioral Policy Program within RAND Social and Economic Well-Being.

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