Marek N. Posard

Photo of Marek Posard
Military Sociologist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Washington Office

Education

Ph.D. in sociology, University of Maryland; M.A. in political science, Loyola University Chicago; B.A. in political science, Loyola University Chicago

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Marek N. Posard is a military sociologist at the RAND Corporation and an affiliate faculty member at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His primary areas of research focus on countering disinformation and the study of military manpower and personnel policies. Posard's research has focused on a range of topics, including unit cohesion, election security, military families, the recruitment and retention of personnel, and modeling will to fight. Most of his research uses survey, experimental, or qualitative methods. Posard holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Maryland, and an M.A. and B.A. in political science from Loyola University Chicago.

Honors & Awards

  • Bronze Medal Award, RAND Corporation
  • Silver Medal Award, RAND Corporation

Recent Media Appearances

Interviews: Federal News Network; Government Matters; Voice of America

Commentary

  • mage grab from handout footage released by the Russia Ministry of Defense allegedly shows Russian soldiers holding weapons allegedly taken from the Ukrainian army weapon depot in the Kherson region, Ukraine, March 16, 2022, photo by EyePress News via Reuters

    Russia's Problems with Military Professionalization

    Even if Russia manages to take control of the territory of Ukraine, the Russian military's underlying problems with professionalization may handicap these occupiers in their efforts to maintain control over that country for the long-term.

    Mar 21, 2022 Breaking Defense

  • U.S. soldiers gather as the sun sets at Camp Williams, Utah, April 16, 2021, photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brent Powell/U.S. Army

    Institutions May Be Key to Countering Extremism in the Military

    Extremism is a symptom of broader social and political headwinds within civilian society. By using existing support programs, military leaders may be able to effectively confront these headwinds early and channel them in productive ways that ultimately preserve the effectiveness and readiness of the U.S. military.

    Oct 4, 2021 The RAND Blog

  • U.S. Army soldiers participate in a parade in Washington, D.C., January 21, 2013, photo by Staff Sgt. Teddy Wade/U.S. Army

    The Link Between Extremism and Military Functioning

    U.S. Department of Defense policy prohibits service members from actively participating in extremist activities. Broadening the policy to include passive forms of participation could introduce two challenges.

    May 20, 2021 Military Times

  • American whistleblower Edward Snowden is seen on a screen as he delivers a speech during the Roskilde Festival in Roskilde, Denmark, June 28 2016, photo by Scanpix Denmark/Mathias Loevgreen Bojesen/via Reuters

    A Snowden Pardon Could Have a Snowball Effect on Protecting National Security Secrets

    If President Trump were to pardon Edward Snowden, then he might encourage vigilante behavior that puts at risk the very sensitive information and operations—meaning American interests and lives—that the U.S. national security system is intended to protect.

    Sep 4, 2020 The National Interest

  • Examples of Facebook pages displayed during a House Intelligence Committee meeting on Russian use of social media to influence U.S. elections in Washington, D.C., November 1, 2017, photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters

    How You Can Fight Russia's Plans to Troll Americans During Campaign 2020

    The goal of Russian interference is to trigger emotional reactions and drive people to ideological extremes, making it nearly impossible to build a consensus. But Americans are less likely to have their emotions manipulated if they are aware that manipulation is the goal.

    Jul 14, 2020 Los Angeles Times

  • Two digital faces facing each other, photo by wildpixel/Getty Images

    Artificial Intelligence and the Manufacturing of Reality

    Humans carry flaws in deciding what is or is not real. The internet and other technologies have made it easier to weaponize and exploit these flaws. And artificial intelligence will likely be used to exploit these weaknesses at an unprecedented scale, speed, and level of effectiveness.

    Jan 20, 2020 Strategy Bridge

  • Top view of a young man with a stack of overdue bills

    What Keeps Millennials Awake at Night Could Change Over Time

    Millennials are less worried than baby boomers about national security topics and more worried about kitchen table issues, such as making ends meet each month and paying off debts. But this may have less to do with the fact that they are millennials and more to do with the fact that millennials are young.

    Jul 30, 2018 United Press International

Publications