A Randomized Controlled Trial of Rise, a Community-Based Culturally Congruent Adherence Intervention for Black Americans Living with HIV

Published in: Annals of Behavioral Medicine (Epub April 2017). doi: 10.1007/s12160-017-9910-4

Posted on RAND.org on May 30, 2017

by Laura M. Bogart, Matt G. Mutchler, Bryce W. McDavitt, David J. Klein, William Cunningham, Kathy Goggin, Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar, Kelsey A. Nogg, Glenn Wagner

Evidence-based HIV treatment adherence interventions have typically shown medium-sized effects on adherence. Prior evidence-based HIV treatment adherence interventions have not been culturally adapted specifically for Black/African Americans, the population most affected by HIV disparities in the USA, who exhibit lower adherence than do members of other racial/ethnic groups.

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