Download eBook for Free

Full Document

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.7 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Summary Only

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.1 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

A key component of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) was to provide options to parents whose children had been attending Title I schools identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring due to failure to achieve adequate yearly progress toward meeting state standards for two or more years. Under NCLB, parents have the option of (1) transferring their children to another school in the district that is not in need of improvement or (2) enrolling their children in supplemental education services (e.g., tutoring, remediation, or other academic instruction) in addition to instruction provided during the school day. This study used data from nine large, urban school districts to examine the characteristics of students participating in the two options and the resulting impact on student achievement. The study found the following: that participation was highest in elementary grades; that African-American students had the highest participation rates of all racial and ethnic groups; that participating students had lower achievement levels than eligible but nonparticipating students; that students who transferred tended to transfer to higher-achieving, racially balanced schools; and that there was no statistically significant (positive or negative) effect on achievement among students participating in the school-choice option.

Reprinted with permission from “State and Local Implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act: Volume I — Title I School Choice, Supplemental Educational Services and Student Achievement,” by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Development, Policy and Program Studies Service, Washington D.C., 2007.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter One

    Introduction

  • Chapter Two

    Data Sources

  • Chapter Three

    Student Participation in Title I Parental Choice Options

  • Chapter Four

    Impact of Title I Parental Choice Options on Student Achievement

  • Chapter Five

    Conclusions

  • Appendix A

    Description of the Nine-District Data Set

  • Appendix B

    Impact of Participation in Title I School Choice: Gains of Current Participants Compared to Those of Future Participants

  • Appendix C

    Meta-Analysis of Effects of Title I School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services

Originally published as: “State and Local Implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act: Volume I — Title I School Choice, Supplemental Educational Services and Student Achievement,” by the U.S. Department of Education, 2007.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation reprint series. The Reprint was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1992 to 2011 that represented previously published journal articles, book chapters, and reports with the permission of the publisher. RAND reprints were formally reviewed in accordance with the publisher's editorial policy and compliant with RAND's rigorous quality assurance standards for quality and objectivity. For select current RAND journal articles, see External Publications.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.